Best Wood For Pizza Ovens – Delivered Free

We deliver the best wood for pizza ovens on a pallet to any address in the United Kingdom. 100% British hardwood supplied. Bulk bags typically include a mix of Ash, Beech and Oak logs. You can book your delivery day and select your log size when ordering. We even donate £4 to plant a tree in Great Britain for every order placed online.


Our best selling logs for pizza ovens:

What do our customers say?  


Our hardwood logs are perfect for pizza ovens for many reasons…

Best Wood For Pizza OvensMost importantly each log has been cut to a size that fits the majority of pizza ovens (roughly 25cm in length).

If you require larger logs for your oven, you can select your log size using our log size selection service.

We kiln dry our logs to ensure they are below 20% moisture, meaning they burn cleanly with minimal smoke. As our logs have such low moisture content, it makes lighting the fire in your pizza oven easier compared to lighting regular seasoned logs which often contain higher moisture levels. Choosing kiln dried logs for pizza ovens is a more convenient and efficient option.

The wood we use is strictly hardwood, meaning our logs take longer to burn so you can focus on making delicious pizzas (rather than constantly topping up logs).

Not only are our kiln dried logs perfect for pizza ovens, our service is too: 

Forget the days of trucks tipping stacks of logs onto your driveway, requiring you have to relocate them quickly to your wood store – we conveniently package all of our logs securely on a pallet.

We offer two delivery options:

1) Small batches of wrapped, log packages.

2) Large, bulk bag orders.

Best Wood For Pizza OvensDid we mention that our firewood is sustainable too? All of our logs are responsibly sourced from British woodland. We do not believe in importing firewood logs from Eastern European countries thousands of miles away.

When you place your order, you will be given the opportunity to book your delivery day.

You can also pay online via your credit or debit card or use your PayPal account when making your purchase.

After placing your order, expect to receive an order confirmation and to be kept up to date throughout the delivery process.

Once you have received your log order, you will also have received a prepaid envelope so that you can free-post the bulk bag back for recycling (please be aware that this service is not available for the small log packages).

Look no further and choose FirewoodFund.co.uk for your pizza oven logs.


Pizza Perfect – Sumptuous food and wood-fired ovens offer the perfect combination

It’s a fact that most people love the wonderful taste of a pizza recently pulled from a specialist oven. And yes, the ingredients and how it’s made are key – but without the fuel used in the cooking process all of this means nothing. Naturally, you’ll want to plan and prepare for the most gorgeous cooking experience ever. This poses an obvious question. Just what is the best wood for pizza ovens? The answers may surprise in your quest to discover the perfect pizza.

Fact: Using under-dried or over-dried wood in your oven won’t make for the best pizzas.

Perfect Pizza Wood

Always remember certain types of wood are of little use when attempting to light such a specialist oven. You need to ignite quickly, efficiently and without having smoke billowing all over the place. What’s more, it’s vital to use something able to blend in with the pizza itself to fully bring out the flavour – and without question, the end result must be good for the consumers’ health. So with all this in mind, never use the following:

  • Painted woods
  • Laminate wood
  • Pressure treated wood
  • Creosote covered wood

Any wood that’s been treated with chemicals should be totally avoided, as should materials carrying a high sap content. What you don’t need is fuel creating soot in the oven itself – that’s not good for food at all. By now you’re probably wondering what type of wood we should be looking at. The good news is, the land of hardwoods will come to your rescue, not only because it burns better and longer than softwoods but also because there are no needles and cones to worry about.

Ready to Burn

A trending term within the wood burning fraternity, ‘ready to burn’ lets consumers know instantly that the wood is suitable for burning. This wood carries a ‘Woodsure’ mark, to show it has been tested and approved by experts. There’s regulation around this wood, to offer you complete piece of mind.

The golden rule is always use kiln-dried hardwoods for your pizza oven. As most of the moisture has already been taken out, it’s quick to ignite and gets to the required temperature pretty quickly.

Best Woods

Here’s a list of perhaps the most popular woods for pizza ovens:

  • Oak will offer a long and quality burn producing excellent heat during the process, is easy to get hold of and is good to the environment.
  • With the correct temperature in mind, apple can burn very hot and has the added bonus of adding to the flavour of the pizza itself and producing a lovely aroma.
  • Ash may be a tad softer but it’s still a hardwood and is readily available, presenting all the best attributes ideal for producing that highly sought after pizza.
  • The Italians use only beech to create those classic pizza dishes – it’s long efficient burn is perfect to keep the temperature at the desired level and it’s not unkind to the environment.
  • Cherry is an excellent choice because it releases the most wonderful scent to help with blending those fabulous topping flavours. It does burn quite fast however, so it’s best when mixed with woods like oak or beech.
  • For something a little different, almond produces a long flame resulting in a small amount of ash. It’s very hot and creates a nutty flavour that’s quite sweet.
  • Maple will certainly give you few problems when looking for the best wood for pizza ovens. It burns efficiently, becomes very hot and lasts a long time – more than enough to help conjure up a heavenly pizza or two.
  • Hornbeam is a really tough hardwood and very dense. It may carry a small flame, but it’s a long burner producing lots of heat.

Fact: A number of building plans exist due to the wide range of techniques by which a wood-fired pizza oven can be built.

Tips for the Oven

Ensure you don’t put in really thick logs as this could result in poorer combustion. You won’t get a consistent temperature and your pizzas won’t taste as good as they should. So make sure you shop around for the best product and use a reputable supplier like Firewood Fund, who only provide thin kiln-dried logs. With wood-fired ovens, little cleaning should be required. Those left over food remnants and any grease will burn away naturally from the heat of the fire. It’s great to know however, that if you prepare properly, you can enjoy an evenly cooked pizza. OK, so there may be some ashes to clear away afterwards, but it’s a small price to pay for food you’ll savour.

Fact: It doesn’t matter which topping you choose for your pizza in a wood-fired oven – it will taste great thanks to your kiln-dried fuel.

 


Frequently Asked Questions:

What is a wood-fired oven?

In simple terms, this is an oven that is fuelled by burning wood, but there are actually two types – black and white ovens. The black variety uses wood burnt in a chamber to create heat. The food is cooked in that same chamber. White ovens are heated by heat transfer from a separate combustion chamber and flue-gas path.

How do you dry wood in an oven?

First, create space so one shelf is in the middle and one is toward the bottom. Then place a large pan at the very bottom of the oven. If you have a convection fan, turn it on and set the temperature to between 210 and 225 degrees Fahrenheit, or 100 and about 110 Celsius. Put your pieces of wood on the centre shelf but don’t let them touch.

At this point, place smaller pieces of wood perpendicular to the hinges of the racks so that they can’t fall off. Leave them for an hour. You can then take some pieces out and check them with a moisture metre. If you haven’t got to the required percentage, put them back in the oven until the desired level is reached. Purchasing kiln-dried logs from a quality supplier, however, will make life much easier. It’s amazing just how long the most basic stock can last, and it will certainly save you money and time in the long run.

What is the perfect temperature for cooking pizza in a wood oven?

The short answer to this is between 400 to 450°C, in order to make the dough go crispy as your selected toppings get pleasantly cooked and blended. Just image that oh so wonderful aroma tempting your taste buds as you go through the process.

How do wood-fired pizza ovens work?

Heat emanates upwards from the oven floor and from the top down creating a temperature suitable for cooking the pizza.

How long does it take to heat a pizza oven?

Experts say to do it properly will take between half an hour and an hour, depending on the size of the oven. The best advice is give yourself plenty of time to prepare in order to get to the desired temperature and let the burn do its work. Creating those lovely pizzas should be an exciting journey.

What else can I cook in my pizza oven?

You may be surprised to learn that there are lots of other foods suitable for cooking in a pizza oven. These range from great tasting roasted vegetables to fresh fish, succulent meats to pies, sea food and even cakes. It’s always worth bearing that in mind, and the process of setting up the all-important fuel should remain the same.

Can a pizza oven get too hot?

The simple answer is yes it can, and this could lead to internal cracks and oven damage. Starting with lower temperatures will mean you can get to read your own oven and judge accordingly. Too hot won’t make for decent pizzas either.

Why are pizza ovens so hot?

To cook a pizza your oven needs to have a consistent temperature. In other words, once the right heat has been created it needs to stay that way. Retaining heat is necessary if you’re producing a number of pizzas, especially working within a certain time-frame.

Do pizza ovens get hot on the outside?

There may be a little warmth, but generally if your wood-fired pizza oven is well insulated in the first place this shouldn’t cause any problems in use.

Why is a wood-fired pizza better?

You are, in essence, producing smoky flavours you can’t fully create using a conventional oven, no matter how hard you try. The high temperatures of a pizza oven can’t be achieved by slow cooking. The pizzas will be unique, meaning they’ll also taste much better.

How long does pizza take to cook in a pizza oven?

The eternal question for many of course. The answer is, once your oven has reached the desired temperature – let’s say 450°C, which is a general norm – you’ll find pizzas will be ready within five minutes, possibly sooner. If your pizza is frozen, more time will be needed to produce the required results. The bottom line is good preparation is everything.

How much is a wood-fired pizza oven?

The vast majority of pizza ovens are wood-fired because pizzas cook best with short, fierce blasts of heat. Cooking time is really quick, from between one to five minutes. In truth, this simply isn’t possible in a gas or domestic oven.

You’ll find a vast array of pizza ovens available on the modern market of all shapes and sizes, both commercial and domestic. You may require an oven just to use on the odd occasion, or something for more regular use, so it pays to shop around. Expect to pay anything from £375 for a basic wood-fired oven of 90 to 100cm. You could opt for an authentic Italian oven from £455 or perhaps a Forno would be ideal at around £400. In truth it’s all down to personal choice, but a good long-lasting oven can be yours for no more than £500.

Your Pride and Joy

You’d be surprised just how many people own a pizza oven, and there’s little doubt the flavour you get from a home-made pizza is special. All of this wouldn’t be possible without that wonderful fuel created from wood. Hopefully our best wood for a pizza oven list will help.

It’s important to experiment a little with your pizza oven safely of course, just to get used to the process and how it all works. Then you can get on with the joy of creating pizzas your friends and family will love for a long time to come.